​​​​S2E3: Leadership Lessons For Challenging Times: Brooks Borcherding, CEO, Cloudreach

S2E3: A conversation with top CEO Brooks Borcherding

In this third episode of our series Leadership Lessons for Challenging Times, Brooks Borcherding, Chief Executive of Cloudreach, the leading multi-cloud services provider, talks with Xquadrant's Founder, Richard Medcalf.

Brooks is a tech savvy, results oriented senior executive with extensive go-to-market experience and a distinguished record building, operating and leading high growth technology companies. He is a highly regarded “cloud” industry entrepreneur credited with two extremely successful transactions including the sale of NaviSite to Time Warner Cable and Datto to Vista Equity Partners. 

Learn these leadership lessons for challenging times...

In this discussion we cover a wide range of topics and benefit from Brooks' longstanding experience as a chief executive.

Listen in and you'll learn:

  • How Cloudreach was able to adapt so successfully to the 'new normal' (9'17")
  • Why sometimes going against conventional wisdom is the way to go  (15'06")
  • The personal side of a successful CEO's life in time of crisis   (17'03")

TRANSCRIPT (Click to open)

Note: this transcript is automatically generated and only lightly neatened up. So this should be used  only to get the gist of the conversation and any transcription oddities should be ignored!

Richard Medcalf    

Hello there Brooks

Brooks Borcherding 

Hey, Richard, are you you? Good to see you

Richard Medcalf  

Good to see you too. Hey, thanks for joining this session. Before we jump in, why don't you give us the elevator pitch? Who are you? And what's Cloudreach for those of us who don't know?

Brooks Borcherding  

Okay, great. Thank you. So Brooks Borcherding. I'm the Chief Executive Officer of Cloudreach. We consider ourselves Cloudreach. Kind of the leading independent cloud services company in the world. We provide the cloud professional services, managed services and also software to help companies adapt and take advantage of the underlying Cloud capabilities. We've been around since 2009. So one of the very first generation cloud services company in the space, if you think about that was really the origination of the cloud about that time. So the very first AWS partner, based out of the UK, and now really an interesting, you know, time and space for us as the adoption of cloud technologies has continued to accelerate. I've been with the company since October. So I came in to basically position the company for this next stage of growth. So we're one of those mid stage growth companies. And before this, I've been in the cloud space for about a dozen years back to 2009 myself, I was with a company called NaviSite where we rolled out one of the first infrastructure and service platforms in 2009, and part of that first generation with Rackspace and Terremark, even predating AWS to Google and Azure, the hyperscale provider to basically dominate the space since then, prior to that we own at Cisco where we overlapped like personally for a period of time. In a while before that with Avaya, I started my career at Accenture. So always an enterprise tech enterprise comms.

Richard Medcalf  

Fantastic. So, you know, incredible CV with all these big brands in it and various executive roles that leadership roles and chief revenue officer roles as part of that. And of course, now you're in this great position, right? cloud is booming. You're a tech company. So as we start to think about leading in and in challenging times, through this recent COVID, ongoing COVID experience, I guess, in some ways, you've probably been able to ride it quite nicely, that probably some good trends, you're probably quite good at working remotely. But what's it been like? I mean, what's worked well for you, as you've had to navigate that and where's the challenge been?

Brooks Borcherding   

So from our perspective, we definitely benefit from being a quote unquote born in the cloud company, so from 2009, we were architected to think cloud first. And it's really our mantra has been, you know, driving it accelerating the adoption of the cloud. So we actually embody that ourselves. So we're in a position where we already had everyone equipped to be able to work remotely mobile or at a client site. So therefore, when the pandemic really started to impact businesses, we could immediately pivot to provide this as continuity to all of our existing customers. So in that regard, it was definitely a benefit for us to be able to offer that continuity of service and we did it for 100% of our customers. 

Richard Medcalf  

That's an amazing thing, right? I mean, just a stop on that. For anything, right? Because you have the promise of cloud was always access anywhere, resilience, geographic independence all the rest of it right? And it's exactly this kind of time when that suddenly becomes the impact of the power of that has become so evident.

Brooks Borcherding  

Yes, and then we're also, you know, being of our scale kind of mid size, we were agile enough to be able to respond to each specific customer requirements. So some customers wanted to extend some period on site. You know, others wanted to say, how do we accommodate this working remotely, but because of that agility, we could accommodate all those different scenarios. So that was positive. Of course, you know, the, the headwind became, if we're dealing with people in retail, if we're dealing with people in transportation, you know, our hospitality, many of those customers simply, you know, closed ranks and look to preserve cash immediately. So you had that you had that headwind. At the same time, we saw a kind of tailwinds of other industries that needed to accelerate their migration to cloud today. They need to scale their businesses and they need to figure out how to get their thousands of workers connected now remotely. You know, that may have been a project they were considering. But it wasn't one of those pressing priorities. They came as a sacrifice to other business needs. So overnight, some of those projects just became, you know, one of the most pressing things that, you know, that they could do, and of course, we've worked with our services wherever they help the greater good. So we did, for example, the pandemic response platform for the state of Florida here in the United States, you know, so how they're visualizing the spread and sprawl of this, how they're modeling out how their actions that they're taking  are positively or negatively affecting the acceleration of infection rates, you know, looking at their supplies and where they might be short and how they could accommodate the needs at the at the local level for redistribution. So some things like that were certainly something that the team embraced to say, we've never really thought of ourselves. of providing work for the greater good. But suddenly, we're helping save lives really, you know, and contribute, you know, to these type of efforts. And so in that regard, that was something that the team has really welcomed as an outcome.

Richard Medcalf   

That's really interesting when you talked about these projects that suddenly kicked off, right, and other things totally closed down. When I was at Cisco, actually, I had a phrase when I was building out partnerships, which was, you know, you can run to the front of the train, but you can't go faster than the train. So sometimes in the client organization, you know, the train is not moving, they've been busy doing something else. They've got other internal things, the train ain't moving, and you can do everything you can do to all the barriers on your side. But you have to accept that kind of certain reality and it sounds like what happened is suddenly a whole load of trains have suddenly decided to leave the station, and you've been ready to jump on that and be there. Another bit of trains have hit the brakes.

Brooks Borcherding  

Exactly, yes, so we were able to change, to use your analogy, change trains pretty quickly. So we were able to re pivot and kind of address where, where we could bring the most value to organizations in this time.

Richard Medcalf  

So how did you as a leader get your mind in the right place and start to prioritize when faced with this all this sudden, all the dials changing on the business? Did you have some kind of playbook? I mean we were talking before about, about John Chambers at Cisco. He had a quite famous playbook within Cisco for when there was a crisis, how, you know, he would say we need to double down on our customers, we need to use our financial strength, we need to save to invest, there were a number of things he would talk about, as his kind of guiding mantras. How do you look at that situation when suddenly everything blew up in the entire business? 

Brooks Borcherding 

That's a good question. I mean, some of it was the practicality of, you know, the most pressing needs of the business. So part of this, just tactically speaking, was when this took hold, just coming to grips that the needs of our 650 employees, right, so how do we immediately address their personal needs? So yes, they can work remotely, but psychologically, you know, what's their working environment, they'll have some pressing personal issues, potentially, with the impact of the pandemic on them, and their families and their environments. And so we went through an extensive kind of management training, where it was all about crisis management for our extended management team sit down the first layer of managers, and we did that very quickly, to try to help them help their teams through this. So that was just the the tactical execution was the imperative for us was making sure we care for our employees. And then we already talked about how we're able to kind of address the ongoing needs for our for our customers. The other is, you know, to use the changing trains analogy, we were able to bring pivot some of our services to meet the most pressing needs of customers. So, you know, our advisory capabilities, we were able to really bring that forward and say, you know, helping lead through crisis, and how to manage remote workforce and thinking about the psychology of organizations in habit. From a technology perspective, it's, you know, enabling remote workforce, VDI, remote access, you know, those type of things, which are just capabilities we have, we could bring those make those more prevalent, and kind of bring them to market more aggressively so that organizations knew we could help them through this. And so everything we kind of presented was we're here to help you and we'll try to be as responsive as possible. That way you step back about the shift. What I think the prevailing thought now is that we had expected cloud adoption to continue to pan out for another 10 years, right. So it's already been 10 years. It's accelerating, but it may be only 10% of workloads have actually moved to the cloud. A lot of the core workloads haven't, so many people are kind of in hybrid states. So we, we believe that it was going to continue to accelerate. But I believe what's happened now with the pandemic is going to significantly compress the time, of that next phase of adoption. Because it's advanced, the theory of cloud first is the imperative way to think about how you build your infrastructure. Right? It wasn't always the prevailing thought. I mean, I think it was accepted over time. Yes, I'll get there at some point, but I don't need to do it now. Now, I think every kind of I.T leader has recognized 'I've got to make that a business priority immediately'.

Richard Medcalf   

If you get caught out once, okay, but if you get caught out twice, you're not going to be looked at well, right? It's like, hang on, we did this in 2020. Right? Why are we doing it again? You know, what, why weren't you ready in 2023 or whatever.

Brooks Borcherding   

So from the macro level, I kind of compare this to those technological transitions that John Chambers would talk about taking advantage of, but similar to kind of void, right, in the, in the late 1990s, when IP telephony, you know, started to come to bear and people start to rethink their consolidated infrastructure to be around the Ethernet and how they could leverage that. That was a very significant, you know, technological shift that we were able to be a part of at Avaya I moved to Cisco. You know, of course, the overarching digital transformation and now cloud is one of those very significant ones and even more recently, in yet really related is, you know, software defined networking, and how the wide area network topologies have dramatically changed now to embrace the benefits of SD Wan, which you know, provides more efficient and effective connectivity to cloud networks, the hybrid networks and so it's interesting to see the significance of, you know, these transitions as they take place. And the important things for us as a business leader, I think, is to be able to identify the ones that are truly transformative, and be able to prepare the organization to take advantage of those inflection points early. So you need to be aggressive at trying to embrace it, take some risk, you know, to be an early player in that space and see if you can position yourself as one of the early leaders to really give you an opportunity to do something special, you know, for the company and for all the employees of the company.

Richard Medcalf  

But it's what I'm hearing is really there's that immediate focus on your employees, there was the second focus on how do we respond to customers and serve them where they are right now? And then if it's long term or longer term, okay, what does this mean in terms of catching, you know, really accelerating this trend? And playing offense, right, and kind of going getting for it?

Brooks Borcherding  

Yes. So I think in that regard, we we've been managing through this effectively in the first couple of a few months. But I think preparing the organization for that acceleration, as that will, I think, inevitably come as we see this acceleration take place.

Richard Medcalf  

What's been the most difficult decision that you've had to make in this period?

Brooks Borcherding  

I think the bravest decision we've made so far has been to hold our footing and we've been able to basically tell our employees look, we have a plan to get through this. We did not take aggressive cost cutting measures, we did not look at reducing staff, we actually held our ground and even started to go to market to say we're looking to attract great talent now, so we saw this as an inflection point to potentially really strengthen ourselves as we're expecting this acceleration to come. I only say kind of brave in the fact that it was potentially against conventional wisdom, right? So you have to make that choice as a CEO to go to the board and your investors and say, this is a bet I want to make and convince them that that's the right play to make. And then be prepared to potentially come out of this faster because we took it as an opportunity to strengthen ourselves.

Richard Medcalf

Yes, brilliant. I mean, zig when everyone else is zagging right? It's often think the counterintuitive path is can be the right one often right?

Brooks Borcherding   

Yes, I mean, I do have the luxury of having a great a backer in Blackstone, I mean, they've been fantastic, you know, as a supporter for Cloudreach and the path that we're on. So that's that is a luxury that we've had to have such great you know, support from our primary investors.

Richard Medcalf

Yes, again, it's the ecosystem around round a company, right, it's not just anything it's the investors and everything. How has this forced you to grow as a leader? What's your been your own journey over these few weeks, few months?

Brooks Borcherding  

Personally, it's a lot of introspection and kind of you know, you can, it's easy to kind of reach out and kind of embrace your teams, right? Externally care for the teams externally. I think it's very hard to think about, how am I being affected by this? Right? So that personal introspection, I think, is very challenging. In speaking personally, I understand this is a podcast, but I will answer authentically. That's a challenge. It's how do you also balance professional, personal, how do you also balance kind of the mental fatigue and strain and obviously, I've got the background, so I'm sitting here on the couch, you know, where I've been resident for the last two months, you know, trying to manage through this and it's just really making sure that I'm strong, maintain my foundation. Personally.

Richard Medcalf  

I've been hearing that a lot. Sorry to interrupt. Sorry. Yes, I've been hearing that a little from leaders, a lot of my clients, right, the CEO CFO CTOs. And they've had that wave of okay, I need to sort out you know, take more responsibilities make sure everyone's okay, there's that adrenalin and then you just say it starts to become the new normal, right? It starts to become this is how it's gonna be for a while. And do I actually have my rhythm my own personal rhythms that have been working for me and sustaining me, you know, have I actually redesigned those re engineered those for the reality of my life now, which is might be locked in and the kids around or whatever it is, and if it hasn't happened, I mean, literally a client I spoke to two days ago, he was exactly in that situation. It was, you know, I haven't been for a run properly for a month. You know, I used to get into work early. Be the first person there have time to get in zone for the day. Now, I'm just kind of like, rocking up five minutes before my first call, and my mind's not in the right place, you know, I'm getting through but I'm not on the front foot, so I think it's it's definitely a timely reflection for leaders.

Brooks Borcherding  

Yes, I do appreciate some of the things people have been sharing you know thought leadership people thought leadership pieces that they've been sharing the CEO for Korn Ferry just puts out some amazing content, to be honest, I didn't know who he was at just happened to be, you know, one of these kind of just distributions and suddenly you pick up his content I'm like, that's a very thoughtful person. And I reflect on it actually share some of the things with my team too and say, hey, this is a really interesting thing to reflect upon, you know, as leaders of the organization and it's just that kind of mental, I think, the psychological, you know, just comfort or preparedness or reflection.

Richard Medcalf  

And thank you as well, Brooks for sharing just a little bit of that personal side because I think it's a mark of a, you know, a real leader to be able to be a bit vulnerable and to do that right, not everybody on a podcast would would talk about yes, sometimes it can be hard as a leader to take that.

Brooks Borcherding  

I think Richard, you know, playing this out longer term, what happens next is going to be really interesting, though. I mean, reflecting on this probably is the norm for us for quite some time. I mean, we're already starting to see lasting effects for the end of the calendar year of companies saying they're, you know, they're going to get you to work remotely or cancellations of events and significant, you know, tech technological meetings, you know, that were planned for the fall are starting to be pushed. And so you start to see these early indications that this could be a long ride. And the kind of psychological effect of that on the organization is also something I think, as leaders we need to really be thoughtful about, right? Is that if this does start to extend out, how do we really manage effectively as a distributed organization over a longer period of time In the face of an ongoing pandemic, right, not just a new norm of yes, maybe it's a better way to work, you know, live and prosper. I'm saying more along the lines of in the face of potential ongoing pandemic. How do you manage that?

Richard Medcalf  

Yes, because the novelty wears off, for everybody and that's the first stage where the adrenaline's going a little bit as you said, at URI, if there are waves as well of this, then that, you know, the second time you have to go into lockdown is gonna be a lot more wearing than the first time. 

Brooks Borcherding  

Yes, yes, exactly. So it's just preparing for those different potential scenarios looking forward and making sure that you're addressing the needs of your employees of your organization and, you know, future relationships with customers in that environment.

Richard Medcalf  

What advice would you give yourself 10 years ago, so if you looked at the Brooks of 10 years ago, with what you'd learned now, you know, in your different leadership roles, what would be? What would be your advice? Or the big learning?

Brooks Borcherding  

10 years ago... Take advantage of the opportunity, be aggressive and bold, and cherish the moments you have, you know, what the accomplishments that and the achievements that you make. I think that's a reflection in the moment of what I tell my team now is we want to make Cloudreach the company where you can come in, do exceptional work, and take advantage of your capabilities to stretch yourself and really do your life's work, right. So knowing that people won't be with the company forever, but I want to give them the opportunities so when they depart in a few years, you know, as they move on in their careers that they can look back and say, that was an opportunity that I really cherish in my career, I got to push myself professionally, I got to do great work, I got to be in an environment with great people, and we have something of, you know, upgrade significance, you know, so when they reflect back, you know, so that's why my leadership objective is create exceptional opportunities for 650 people, and I hope that they get to reflect back on that as one of their great life's experiences.

Richard Medcalf   

Yes, that's beautiful. I mean, I think when you can do that, right, when you can help people thrive, almost everything else kind of takes care of itself, right. I mean, the happy people in the business is going to create a fantastic business fundamentally, as long as you don't get into the comfort zone too much and all the rest of it, right, but if you give people the chance to grow and push themselves, then generally good things come out of it.

Brooks Borcherding  

And we try to use that to a competitive advantage to attract great talent, and you know, and to nurture and develop great talent, too. So that's the premise of, you know, how Cloudreach is going to be successful going forward.

Richard Medcalf   

Perfect. So let me ask you a few quickfire questions about you know, what built you up as a person as a leader? What's your favorite book?

Brooks Borcherding  

My favorite book? Oh, I think my favorite book of all time and this might sound a little bit hokey, but it's probably Jurassic Park to be honest.

Richard Medcalf  

There we go.

Brooks Borcherding    

And I only because, this was before the movies before all that, but the fact of how Thomas Craven kind of looked at emerging technologies and wove that in to a fantastical story, but it was on the cusp of what's actually possible, right and what they were finding these DNA samples of dinosaurs. What's the potential of this? So he took that kind of, you know, interesting thought and just, you know, like I said, wove it into an interesting story. I wasn't a big fan of how that continued in the movies, but just the book itself, I went and I read the rest of his kind of many, many, many of his different stories like the Andromeda strain and things like this. So, you know, I thought it was just really interesting of you know, that how you could find somebody that like a scientist that had the ability to create that type of that type of narrative. 

Richard Medcalf  

Yes, it brings science or tech to life a little bit, right when you push it, push it a little bit, but it's often though things aren't so far fetched as we think, right when we look back a decade or two afterwards. What about your favorite kind of personal productivity tip? Right? What's one thing that really works for you to get stuff done?

Brooks Borcherding   

My personal approach is more along the lines of hard work, to be honest. So I have a mantra you could have, you know, create your own luck. And I just think that's based on effort base return. So, you know, I do do you made a comment earlier about, you know, people waking up early and having that time of thought or reflection, I still do that, but tend to put in quite a bit of time each day just for the body of work that's in front of us. And so often, it's just, you know, working at that type of hard pace, and instead trying to create your own luck, so you know, don't leave any rock unturned, especially when you face an opportunity. You know, like the cloud adoption, you know. I don't want to look back in three years and think that we were right there to take advantage of this and we missed it. I want to know we did everything we could to capitalize on this.

Richard Medcalf  

Yes,  so I see often with my clients, it's like, how do we take the brakes off? You know, like, how do we actually clear the glue or the gunge out the system so that we can actually do what we need to do right at the speed. What about an aspiring leader who's somebody who you know who's in your mind as somebody who's inspiring or has been an influence on you as a leader?

Brooks Borcherding  

You mentioned John Chambers earlier. I got to work pretty closely with John in the role that I was in at Cisco, here in New York. And so got to have you know, a bit of personal exposure with Tom but John was a great leader because of the way that he can raise culture. I hadn't really seen anybody embrace culture like he had and how he leveraged that to competitive advantage for the for the company. But the mantra around customer first that was completely embodied by him, like his ethos was do whatever you need to do to satisfy the customer. And he empowered everybody in your in the company to be able to make a call and they could bring whatever resources they need to bring to bear to make sure they were doing the right thing for a customer, and everybody knew that because he reinforced it. Right. So yes, it was just really interesting, though, to see how they reinforced and built that culture around this customer centricity, which is really something I learned in that regard. I have to admit to being a big Steve Jobs fan ever since I was young, right so I grew up in the PC revolution. And I watched every one of Steve Jobs, you know, presentations, every one of them so I just thought he was fascinating to be able to marry the technology to the industry and the way he could articulate you know, the show that he presented was completely like it was like he was speaking to me individually. Yes, that's exactly what I thought. And I recently had a recent opportunity to work with Austin McCord here at Datto, and that's where I was chief revenue officer recently, also is fascinating because he kind of was similar to Steve Jobs in that regard. But he started Datto in college when he was 21. And I joined him as he was the CEO when he was probably 27. And he had a workforce of 800 people, they were all kind of millennial right in that age group. But the way he led a millennial workforce, as a millennial, was amazing, right? And so you get to see the different way of communicating a different way of creating communities, the different way of how you're motivating that type younger workforce would be first ham there as an older, more seasoned person was a real learning experience. And then to see him succeed, you know, by selling out selling his company created for over a billion dollars and being able to, you know, by the time he's 30 just be one of those kind of real successful young entrepreneurs and moving on to something else was really interesting experience as well.

Richard Medcalf  

Thank you for sharing that. That's awesome. Yes, fighting to be around those kind of people always. What about your favorite quotes or motto?

Brooks Borcherding

So it's interesting speaking of Datto, so we would have our quotes on the back of our business cards. That was one of the kind of quirky things that and I chose a quote from Nelson Mandela, which was 'it always seems impossible until it's done'. And I'm just thinking about that recently, considering the pandemic right, but how applicable that quote is in the time we're in right now, to come from Elsa Mandela but a global pandemic of who knows, you know how large, and impactful this will be as this plays out. But you know, being in the center of that and going through that, and sometimes feeling that overwhelming fear of, you know, possibility, knowing that we're going to get through it. And then when we reflect back, we may not know exactly how we're going to do it today, but we know we're going to get through it. So when it's done we'll have thought we kind of conquered the impossible.

Richard Medcalf  

Yes, impossible is really interesting, I mean, I am actually quite often love setting impossible goals with my clients. Not so they have a 17 step plan to get there. It's impossible, right, by definition, but it's more it's like, who would you need to be to be the kind of person that would achieve that goal and to bring that right into the present. That's a really incredibly powerful approach. So I've little, you know, a model called the million dollar coach is like, well, if I was if clients pay me a million dollars a year, well, how would I be showing up? Right? How would I be spending my days? How do I get up what I do in the morning? You know, how do I show up, it's a really nice way of bringing something new out of you, I think, as a person.

Brooks Borcherding   

Yes, it's true, different perspective, different thought process.

Richard Medcalf  

So my final mini question is, I've have it on good authority that you're one of the world's greatest gurus on 1980s pop music. So, who's your favorite 80s band?

Brooks Borcherding  

Pop music, it's 1980s rock music rock even better,

Richard Medcalf  

Even better

Brooks Borcherding  

Because that's the that's a nuance of this is there was some really crappy music from the 1980s but...

Richard Medcalf   

Okay, so who's your favorite rock band from the 80s?

Brooks Borcherding  

I have to say this is probably even to the 70s 80s I still think Pink Floyd is amazing. And you know, I can still sit down and listen to Animals or The Wall or any number of their albums Dark Side of the Moon from end to end and find it to be a very kind of cathartic experience. So I just think they're the mastery of an intimacy of that intricity in transe is of that music is really is amazing of how they were able to stitch that all together and the quality of them as individual musicians, but as a band, to me is pretty stunning, really, when I think about it, but then you have all the classics and you'll have like The Rush the rushes of the world, just some epic type of rock music and it's funny my 17 year old son now as a 1980s playlist, and he say he goes back and so if we go out driving together, he'll put on his 80s playlist and he tells me 'dad, these are great, these are some great songs because none of my friends know them so every time I play them, it's like the first time they're hearing this and it's like this is some of this stuff is great'.

Richard Medcalf

One of my greatest achievements actually has been to kind of grow my own band. I'm a guitarist, I love all that stuff about music. And so I've now got my kids both play different instruments so we can be a bit of a band and I'm a big queen fan. And when the Queen film came out, my daughter came back from school saying, you know, Dad, I'm really annoyed everyone's a queen fan now, but they don't understand like they don't really know it all like I do, because they've like been exposed forcibly to their entire back catalogue.

Brooks Borcherding

You might feel like this little little wave may leave it but my, my daughter now my 12 year old daughter, she could if you ask her, she has her top five Pink Floyd songs and she has her top five Beatles songs. And so it's super in fact, the other day she went online, and she ordered herself a Dark Side of the Moon T shirt, and she didn't even think tell me that she comes down like for lunch. I see her after virtual school. And she's wearing this Pink Floyd T shirt. I'm like, where'd you get this? I ordered it. I was like, good for you. 

Richard Medcalf  

Yes, that's good, absolutely. Very proud moment, right where you've managed to persuade your kids to like the same kind of music. Hey, it's been great to speak. And so just tell me where can people find more out about you? Or about Cloudreach you know if they want to upgrade their, their cloud game, where do they go?

Brooks Borcherding  

Yes, that's really easy. Go to our website, and you'll find your way right, we're trying to tell our story through the web, and they can reach me at brooks@cloudreach.com. So pretty simple way to reach me directly. I have a mantra internally for my employees that says no site unresponded to so we kind of embraced, you know, transparency, radical transparency in that regard. But I do have to say for people to reach out to me externally as well. I think fostering a community is a great thing to do.

Richard Medcalf

Well, hey Brooks it's been a fantastic conversation. Really enjoyed it and thanks for you know, being open and sharing lots of great stories and ideas to everybody. So, once again, really appreciate it and thank you. 

Brooks Borcherding  

My pleasure. Thanks, Richard. 

Richard Medcalf  

Take care

Richard Medcalf

I hope you enjoyed this conversation. Now let's turn to you. If you're a top performer, who's already accomplished great things, and yet knows that there's a whole new level of impact and potential open to you, why don't we get on the phone and strategise on how to get you there. Head over to xquadrant.com/speak to find out more. Until next time, be bold and be purposeful.


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